Interfaith dialogue links religion with climate change

An interfaith dialogue on climate change will be held at the Ateneo de Naga University on November 14, 2014 bringing together various major religious congregations and ecumenical groups, scientists, government experts, and decision makers.

The dialogue primarily aims to broaden the participants’ knowledge and understanding on climate change issues as they influence practices that either promote or discourage environmental protection and conservation. It also aims to help connect and strengthen interfaith environmental advocates in the region; address the issues of overconsumption and wastefulness of resources; foster the concept of stewardship as an exercise of one’s self control; and to enhance an orientation that favors moral responsibility to provide for current and future generations.

Faith groups expected to participate include the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines, CBCP National Secretariat for Social Action, Justice and Peace, Association of Major Religious Superiors in the Philippines, Islamic Da’wah Council of the Philippines, Philippine Center for Islam and Democracy, Philippine Council for Evangelical Churches, National Council of Churches in the Philippines, United Council of Churches in the Philippines, and the Jewish Association of the Philippines.

Presentations such as Climate Change Situationer, Mobilizing faith-based communities to address climate change, impacts of climate change in the country and in the provinces, and grassroots adaptation and best practices in addressing climate change will serve as inputs to a workshop to identify key action agenda and to form a mechanism to foster consultation. It will likewise craft a declaration and resolutions for communities to consider.

The interfaith dialogue in Naga City is one of the eight dialogues in key areas including Malacanang, Cagayan de Oro, Tacloban, Negros, Marikina and Isabela/Ilocos.

Climate change being widely known to have been caused primarily by human activities  also has religious underpinnings. Adaptations vary but religion plays an important role in shaping a person’s values and ethical standards that could help redirect resource use trend. 

Press Release: November, 2014

News

STATEMENT OF DENR SECRETARY GINA LOPEZ ON THE PROPOSED UNDERWATER THEME PARK IN CORON, PALAWAN

“If the underwater theme park would cause the destruction of corals, right away, I will say no way. The fishermen need corals. The corals are the home for the fish, and some of our corals have shells and sponges that can cure cancer. I will never allow our biodiversity to be killed for money that some people want to make.

The Philippines is a country of seven thousand islands, which has the highest endemism per unit area in the entire world, while Palawan is the number one island destination in the planet. It has rich biodiversity and lots of ecotourism potentials that should be primarily tapped by the Filipino people for the Filipino people.

In any case, whatever decision that the DENR will make shall be filtered and anchored on social justice, which means that the marine resources of Palawan should benefit the greater majority.”###

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